The Dolomite name was again used from 1937 to 1940. The car this time had a 1,767 cc four-cylinder engine and saloon body. The design was overseen by Donald Healey  and featured a striking new design of radiator grille by Walter Belgrove.

The cars were marketed as "the finest in all the land" and targeted directly at the luxury sporting saloon market.

Triumph had been moving progressively upmarket during the 1930s, and the 1938 Dolomites were very well equipped, with winding windows in the doors, automatic chassis lubrication, a leather-bound steering wheel adjustable for rake and reach, dual hydraulic brake circuits, twin trumpet horns, and spot lamps included in the price.[10] There was even a tray of fitted tools slotted beneath the driver's seat cushion, and for an extra 18 guineas buyers could specify a radio.

The body was aluminium over a rot-proofed ash frame.

Like many Triumphs of that time, the car followed the American trend of concealing its radiator behind a flamboyant shining metal grill.[10] The British market, then as now, was in many ways a conservative one, however, and, before Dolomite production was suspended completely, Triumph had time to introduce a "Vitesse"-branded version of the Dolomite on which the grill had been removed and the car's own radiator was exposed in the traditional manner. 

Roadster coupé

Roadster drophead coupé s.w.b. with dickey seat
This is an open version of the 14/65, announced 29 March 1938, with seating for three people on a single bench seat and "two additional outside seats in the tail, reminiscent of the dickey seat that was at one time common" for two more people behind.

The hood folded completely into the body to give the appearance of an open sports car. The car was announced with the 1,767 cc (107.8 cu in) engine with twin SU carburettors.

A two-tone (coffee and cream) version of this model featured in the 1945 film version of Noël Coward's Blithe Spirit, directed by David Lean. It was driven by Rex Harrison.

 

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